Fall into line for this: a committed ‘Bring It On’ soars in Selma

Fall into line for this: a committed ‘Bring It On’ soars in Selma

A s we settled into my seat Thursday night before Selma Arts Center’s “Bring It On,” we glanced down and saw a line that is thick a floor dividing the auditorium. On “my” side, the viewers had been seated in Jackson senior high school territory, one of many two competing campuses depicted in a competitive cheerleading showdown in this musical encouraged by the film “Bring It On.” The strand that is green of Gras beads that I’d been given, now loitering my neck, marked my assigned allegiance. One other side for the line — the “red” side — ended up being Truman twelfth grade nation. The battleground ended up being set. The line ended up being drawn.

Pictured at top: Kenzie Stafford has a celebrity change as Campbell in “Bring It On.” Photo: Selma Arts Center

I’ll be blunt right here: whenever I discovered that the Selma Arts Center and director/choreographer Michael Flores made a decision to program “Bring It On,” We wondered in the event that movie theater business had crossed a line when it comes to aspiration. (Indeed, certainly one of the show’s many powerful words is: “How Oceanside escort do you realize who we have been unless we cross the line?”) Issued, many Broadway musicals could be scaled straight down, also people with massive sets and explosive unique impacts. But “Bring It On” — a peppy, engaging show with a few great music by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Tom Kitt — calls for a cast that doubles as a full-fledged competitive cheerleaders. We’re dealing with accuracy routines and stunts that are big. You can’t fake it.

We needn’t have worried. Because of the final end of “Bring It On,” I happened to be invigorated by this well-prepared and handsomely produced show. And I also felt pleased with its hard-working cast, team and team that is creative. Flores put their cast through a mandatory two-week “Cheer Camp” before regular rehearsals started. Achieved it repay? Well, I don’t like to over-gush. At no point did we ever think I became viewing cheerleaders that are professional here on phase. Specially in the final end of this show, “Bring It On” calls for an even of visual spectacle and strength when it comes to cheerleading techniques which was out from the reach associated with the Selma players. Exactly what i did so get was a terrific sense of espirit de corps from the company that is entire. They link emotionally on a fierce and level that is unified. Their intensity and enthusiasm is infectious.

I am made by this show desire to cheer.

Alas, you can find just three shows left. (we updated visitors yesterday in the admission situation.) You are hoped by me get to view it.

Some ideas on the manufacturing:

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The storyline: Kenzie Stafford soars as Campbell, the senior school cheerleading captain for nationwide champ Truman senior school. Year she starts out the show on the top of the world — and then takes a tumble when she’s redistricted to another school just as she’s starting her senior. Jackson twelfth grade, a much more diverse destination than Truman, doesn’t have even a cheerleading squad. Alternatively, a hard-working Danielle (a polished and impressive Kay Wilkins), leads the school’s hip-hop dance team. As Campbell struggles to fit right in, the play has plenty of cheerful banter about competition and course, but there’s usually a wry realism that underpins the teenager humor. In a number of wildly implausible events — this can be on the basis of the film variation, in the end — a newly created Jackson cheer squad eventually ends up challenging Campbell’s school that is old the nationwide championships.

Danielle (Kay Wilkins) leads the Truman senior high school cheer squad in “Bring It On.” Photo / Selma Arts Center

The leading part: Stafford’s vocals are actually strong, along with her dancing — specially in an amusing bit as an Irish leprechaun — is great. She’s additionally quite impressive in carrying the extra weight of this show on her behalf character’s shoulders. (Campbell’s hopes, dreams, desires and transgressions drive the plot.) She’s restrained when you need to, goofy at in other cases, and constantly providing the feeling that she’s a real individual up there on stage, maybe not a cardboard cheerleader cutout. We felt there are occasions within the show whenever Stafford, with increased training, could strengthen her performing chops — We kept planning to feel a tad bit more of Campbell’s side that is dark but she demonstrates great possible in musical movie theater. This will be a star part, and she excels.